Category Archives: Flashback Friday

Flashback Friday

Flashback Friday

This is an image of the construction of Boston’s Central Artery which razed and divided parts of downtown neighborhoods. This photo taken from the Custom’s Building looks out at the North End in Boston during the 1950s.

The photo is courtesy of the BPL archives.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayImage of the Charles River at Norumbega Park, Newton in 1919 photographed by Leslie Jones. The photo is courtesy of the BPL archives.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayNot all flashback posts are all that old. This is what Commonwealth Avenue looked like just five months ago.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback Friday ProvincetownThis week’s Flashback Friday post is courtesy of The Boston Globe archives and shows Commercial Street in Provincetown in 1979.

Want to see more? The Boston Globe recently posted a collection of vintage images of Cape Cod here.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayLast week I featured the Boston Garden which you can see in this artist rendering of Boston by all the train tracks leading into North Station.   This “$110,000 highway in the skies” as the Boston Globe called it back in 1954 became obsolete decades ago and was replaced by the Central Artery Tunnel Project better known as the Big Dig.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayWith the Boston Bruins playing against Chicago Blackhawks for the Stanley Cup Finals in game 2 tomorrow, I thought I’d feature the original Boston Garden – home to the Boston Bruins.  This building first opened in 1928 and was demolished in 1998 and replaced by a “New” Boston Garden.

In front of the Garden you see an elevated portion of the Green Line subway that vaguely resembles Chicago’s metro the “El”.  Let’s hope that the Bruins will eek out a win tomorrow night before they return to the Boston Garden for game 3.

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayBoston Area Gay and Lesbian Youth (BAGLY) officially forms in 1980 making it  the first youth run organization in Boston. BAGLY continues today as the second oldest continuously running youth organization in the country. Talk about Boston Strong.  I can’t imagine the courage these teenagers must have had to be out and proud in the early 1980s.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayFor many years Washington Street in Boston’s South End had an elevated Orange Line that was loud and cast long shadows over this busy boulevard that connects Roxbury to downtown Boston.  Over the past 20+ years, Boston’s South End has undergone a renaissance of sorts.  Gone is the elevated Orange Line and boarded up buildings that have been replaced by new apartment buildings, restaurants and cafes.

Back in 2009 I also  wrote about this stretch of the South End in my Flashback series entitled, Elevated Orange Line.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayEarlier this month The Boston Globe shared aerial photographs of South Boston from the 1920s.   This is a photo of the industrial section of South Boston – now called the Seaport District.  Note downtown Boston in the upper left quarter of the photograph.  You can make out Boston’s Custom’s House.

Like these photos and want to see more – Link Here.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayBoston-native, Donna Summer, the original disco diva, passed away at the age of 63, on May 17th, 2012, but I still love her and her music. What’s your favorite Donna Summer song? Here is one of mine.

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayThe photos above are of Shawmut Avenue in the South End.  The top left was taken in 1974 and the second shows the same stretch of the street back in 2012.

Usually when I post photos in my flashback series there are stark changes.  What I love about this photograph from the Boston Globe library is how little has changed.  The South End has retained its charm although we no longer see wheel barrels being rolled down Shawmut Avenue.

Past Flashback Friday Posts

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayPost Office Square is now a 1.7 acre park in the heart of Boston’s financial district, but as the top photo shows, for many years this was an above ground parking garage.  Fortunately some years back it was decided to build a below ground parking garage to create a more open and inviting space. In good weather, thousands of men and women come out to eat in the park each day.

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayThe USS Constitution was named by President George Washington after the Constitution of the United States of America.  At 216 years old, she is the world’s oldest commissioned naval vessel afloat.

Visitors are more likely to see this ship in the Charlestown Navy Yard along the Freedom Trail, but last year I snapped this photo of the USS Constitution in Boston Harbor when I was returning on the ferry from Provincetown.

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayTomorrow, April 20th is Fenway Park’s 103rd birthday.  The fact it is still here is a testament to the city of Boston and Red Sox fans everywhere who have been coming to games at Fenway Park for generations.

Fenway Park is the oldest Major League Baseball stadium still in use, but it looks great thanks in part to continued improvements. I wish more professional sports teams and the cities who host those teams would learn from the lesson Fenway has taught us here in Boston; traditions matter and can help carry you through tough seasons if only because Sox fans the world over consider Fenway Park their home.  And as the saying goes, “home is where the heart is.”

Flashback Friday

Flashback FridayThe Boston Phoenix 1966 – 2013 

This may not truly be a flashback in the sense that the shuttering of The Boston Phoenix happened so recently, but I still cannot wrap my head around the fact that The Boston Phoenix is no more; ceasing all publications approximately one month ago after publishing a free weekly paper in the city since 1966.

The Phoenix, as I called it, was a well recognized alternative weekly paper that was popular with college students and regularly reported on the city’s music scene, politics and local happenings.