Category Archives: Poetry

Winter poetry

poetry, family, NH, LakeYesterday Boston set a record for the most total snowfall in a 7-day period. While it was mesmerizing to watch, snowfall isn’t really meant for city life.  It makes getting around a hassle and it loses its beauty quickly.  However, it did make me think about one of my favorite poems by one of my favorite poets, Robert Frost.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

Nothing Gold Can Stay

Robert Frost, poetry

Boston Esplanade, October 2014

One of my favorite poems is by Robert Frost.  Each autumn I post his poem, Nothing gold can stay.  It is obvious that Frost was inspired by the fall foliage in New England when he wrote this poem back in 1923. I hope you enjoy the poem as much as I do.

Nature’s first green is gold
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

Please Master by Allen Ginsberg

erotic poetry, gay poetryProbably the most erotic poem  I ever read is Allen Ginsberg’s poem, Please Master.  I’m fairly certain nearly anyone who reads this aloud will give pause at certain lines and be left blushing.  This could possibly be the most explicit poem ever written so beware, but if intrigued you may read the full poem here.

Tonight I Can Write (The Saddest Lines) by Pablo Neruda

Pablo Neruda, poetry, love

The quote comes from Neruda’s poem, Tonight I Can Write (The Saddest Lines), which you may read here.  The poem was published in Neruda’s book, Love: Ten Poems. It was this book and its poems that served as the inspiration behind the 1990s film, Il Postino, a breathtakingly beautiful Italian film.

I Hit Send or Modern Meltdown by Stephen Boyle

Check out Steven Boyle’s video from the Penn State student poetry slam.  His nearly 4 minute video about coming out at the age of 20 is touching and hilarious; part poetry and part Mad Lib.

Definitely watch this video but be careful since the language makes it inappropriate for work.

 

The Dark Room Collective born in Boston

Poetry

Source: Poets House
Photo by: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Earlier this week The New York Times had an interesting article for those of you interested in poetry and or African-American culture.  The Time’s article, The Dark Room Collective: Where Black Poetry Took Wing, was really interesting.

Founded in 1987, this group that formed here in Boston after attending the funeral of James Baldwin in NYC brought together black writers and artists to work, bond and unintentionally nurtured a cultural movement all from a 3-story Victorian house at 31 Inman Street in Cambridge, MA – at least that is how The New York Times tell it.  The article says that the collective proved to be a boom in African-American poetry “arguably as aesthetically significant in the writing world as the work of the Beat Generation, The New York School, the Fugitives, The Black Arts Movement and even the Harlem Renaissance.”

Do you love poetry? Are you interested in African-American culture? You may want to check out this article from the NYT.

 

 

A limerick in honor of St. Patrick’s Day

Happy St. Patrick’s Day.  I’ve republished a slightly naughty limerick that I wrote a few years ago in honor of the holiday.

Lim’ricks are the naughtiest prose
Dirty rhymes we love to compose 
Men from Nantucket
Shouting, “Go $uck it!”
Are fun to write I suppose

If you have a limerick you’d like to share, I’d enjoy reading it.  Feel free to e-mail me or leave it in the comments section.