Category Archives: Boston

Scenes from Boston & Provincetown’s Nightlife

“in love in provincetown, 1936” source: woolfandwilde.com

Boston’s History Project is hosting an interesting virtual event this Thursday at 7PM with a good friend of mine that you may find very interesting.

All are welcome to join local author and History Project board member Russ Lopez for a reading from his book The Hub of the Gay Universe: An LGBTQ History of Boston, Provincetown, and Beyond.  Russ will share fun stories about Provincetown and Boston nightlife through the years.

Thursday, April 2nd at 7:00PM
Register on Zoom

This is free but donations are always gratefully accepted. Click here to support The History Project’s mission to document, preserve, and share LGBTQ history.

Boston’s first marijuana dispensary (finally) opens on Monday

Marijuana was made legal after the question was put to voters at the ballot box in 2016. Statewide 53.7% of the vote was in favor of legalization with 46.3% voting against “Question 4” as it came to be known. In the city of Boston even more of the electorate (67%) voted in favor of legalizing marijuana.

The current Mayor of Boston and Governor of Massachusetts did everything they could to slowdown and complicate the process for paving the way for businesses to open. However, on Monday, Boston will FINALLY have its first recreational marijuana shop.

Pure Oasis pot shop is located at 430 Blue Hill Avenue between Jones Hill and Eglston Square. Their daily hours of operation are between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Pure Oasis happens to also be the first applicant under the economic empowerment equity programs created by the commissio, which gives priority to applicants from areas disenfranchised by the war on drugs.

You can read more about Boston’s first marijuana dispensary for recreational use, here.

Median Boston rental prices near MBTA subway stations

boston rent, renthop, rent hopRentHop has shared their annual Boston T Rent Map, which focuses on MBTA subway stations. They have created an interactive version of this map that lets you select individual T stops to show median rents for 1 bedrooms nearby.

Obviously, the downtown neighborhoods are most expensive with most stops in downtown featuring rents in the $3,000 range for a one-bedroom unit, but as you move out of the city center rents drop. Below are some examples noted for each line as uncovered by RentHop.

  • $1,247  btwn Aquarium ($3,397) and Maverick ($2,150) – Blue Line
  • $1,100  btwn Back Bay ($3,600) and Mass Ave ($2,500) – Orange Line
  • $900 btwn Broadway ($3,300) and Andrew ($2,400) – Orange Line
  • $649  btwn Kendall/MIT ($3,149) and Central ($2,500) – Red Line
  • $600  btwn Copley ($3,100) and Hynes ($2,500) – Green Line

Eater Boston’s increasingly narrow view of Boston dining

Augustana BostonDespite the critical headline, I want to be clear that I like the Eater Boston blog. I often Tweet out and share their articles, but the blog, which describes itself as a “Food news and dining guides for Boston” does a terrible job of sharing news about and championing the dining scene of restaurants not in a downtown neighborhood, Cambridge or Somerville – and it appears to be getting worse.

Eater Boston maps illustrate my point

Boston’s ten largest neighborhoods by population are (in order): S. Dorchester, Roxbury, Brighton, Jamaica Plain, East Boston, Mattapan, South Boston, Hyde Park, West Roxbury and the South End. Combined these neighborhoods account for more than 60% of Boston’s total population. However, Eater Boston routinely overlook all but South Boston and the South End. What gives Eater?

Eater Boston needs to step up their game

Is Eater Boston really committed to providing food news and dining guides for Boston when the majority of residents’ neighborhoods are largely ignored? There is no doubt that the downtown neighborhoods have a more active dining scene, but it seems that communities south and west of The Fenway and South End are almost universally overlooked in practically every “map” and blog post. Watertown and Medford based restaurants are more likely to be featured than a restaurant in Dorchester and that’s just plain crazy.

I know Eater Boston can do better and want them to live up to their potential by providing all of Boston a chance to shine.  I’m asking Eater Boston to step up their game; stop fixating on the same 5-6 neighborhoods. Get to know the rest of Boston. Start to feature the dining scene in neighborhoods outside of downtown and encourage your readers to leave these downtown enclaves to visit hidden gems in places like Dorchester, Roxbury, Brighton, East Boston, Mattapan, etc.

Museum of Fine Arts celebrates 150 years

Museum of Fine Arts BostonThe Museum of Fine Arts Boston (MFA) celebrates its 150 anniversary this year and to kick off the year long celebration, tomorrow – Wednesday, February 5th  – admission is free to the public.  Take advantage of this Boston institution and plan a visit to see a current or upcoming exhibit this year. Below are a few exhibitions that caught my eye, but for a complete list, visit MFA exhibitions.

Mural: Jackson Pollock | Katharina Grosse, through February 20, 2020
A pairing of artwork – then and now.

Collecting stories: A mid-century experiment, through March 8, 2020
Which artist will stand the test of time – and who will decide?

Black Histories – Black Futures, January 20 – June 20, 2020
Teen curators take action.

Writing the future Basquiat and Hip Hop Generation April 5 – August 2, 2020
The first major exhibition to contextualize Basquiat’s work in relation to his peers associated with hip-hop culture.

Monet and Boston: A lasting impression, April 18 – August 23, 2020
All of the MFA Monet paintings will be on exhibit for a limited time.

As a special “thank you” to MFA members and as part of the museum’s 150th anniversary celebration, members can bring an additional guest to the museum for FREE throughout 2020. 

If you are not a member, Boston residents can reserve a pass to visit the MFA for free from the Boston Public Library. Additionally, active members of the military and their families, University students, Bank of America customers and K-12 school teachers from New England (just present your current teacher ID) all can visit the museum for free. More about hours and how to visit for free, here.

Founded in 1870, the MFA, first opened its doors to the public on July 4, 1876, the nation’s centennial in Copley Square. It moved to its current location on Huntington Avenue in 1909 to accommodate its growing collection.

Boston Public Library McKim building opened 125 years ago

BPLThe Boston Public Library (BPL) in Copley Square first opened its doors to the public on Sunday, February 3, 1895, and tomorrow marks the 125th anniversary of this iconic building’s opening. While this wasn’t the first home of the library, it is the only home anyone alive today would know.

The BPL is the 3rd largest public library in the United States behind only the U.S. Library of Congress and the New York City Public Library. However, it’s not the amazing amount of research nor its prized collections or priceless artwork  that make this such a beloved institution.

The BPL anchors the west side of Copley Square in the heart of Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. It is where many important cultural and sporting events take place; such as the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Since 1897, every April (on Patriot’s Day) tens of thousands of runners cross in front of the  Boston Library and every parade of note either lines up alongside or pass by these buildings.

BPL, Todd Van HoosearThe original building (a.k.a. The McKim building) and its gorgeous courtyard that was inspired by Rome’s Palazzo della Cancelleria are sanctuaries I go to often and places I show anyone who visits Boston. Bates Hall (shown below) on the second floor of the McKim Building features 50-foot-high barrel vault ceiling and is a must-see for any architecture enthusiasts. Travel + Leisure agrees with me too – check out their 2016 article about the BPL here.

BPL

UNIVERSALIMAGESGROUP/GETTY IMAGES

Next time you’re in the Back Bay, take a few minutes to pay the BPL a visit and appreciate this cultural gem.

Outdoor ice skating rinks in Boston

The winter is more fun if you take advantage of the colder weather to engage in seasonal activities like ice skating (it doesn’t matter if you’re crap at it). Channel your inner Adam Rippon and make plans to go out and have some fun.

Below are five ice skating rinks that you can enjoy as well as some suggestions on where you can go after to warm up. 

Frog Pond Skating Rink at the Boston Common
$6 Admission || $12 rental fee
Warm up after by ordering a Hot Toddy at Yvonne’s

The Rink at 401 Park in The Fenway 
$10 Admission || $6 rental fee
Warm up after at the bar at TimeOut Boston

Snowport Winter Village in Seaport
$5 Admission || $5 rental fee
Warm up after with a decadent hot chocolate at Flour

Community Ice Skating in Kendall Square
$5 Admission || $8 rental fee
Warm up after with a double espresso at barismo

DCR Kelly Outdoor Rink in JP
Free Admission || $3 rental fee
Warm up after with a decadent hot chocolate at JP Licks