Category Archives: What’cha Reading

Boston Gay Men’s book club is reading Kens

Boston Book Festival, BBFHeterosexuality is so last season in Raziel Reid’s book, Kens, which was published this past September.

The book has been described as a gay Heathers meets Mean Girls. Kens is a about the three Kens of Willows High who rule the school and Tommy Rawlins who so desperately wants to be accepted by the Kens. This is a funny and provocative story about identity and acceptance.

Boston’s Gay Men’s Book Club will meet Monday, November 26th at The Trident Cafe & Booksellers on Newbury Street in the Back Bay to dish on this novel. All are welcome. For more information click on the link below.

Boston Gay Men’s Book Club
Kens by Raziel Reid
Monday, November 26th at 7PM

If you’re open to supporting local bookstores, try one of the links I’ve shared below, which takes you right to the book’s page so you can order it online in just a couple of clicks!

razel reidBrookline Booksmith in Coolidge Corner
Harvard Bookstore in Harvard Square
Papercuts JP in Jamaica Plain
Porter Square Bookstore in Porter Square
Trident Bookseller’s & Cafe in Back Bay

 

Gay Men’s Book Club is reading The Disintegrations

shirtless guy, man with glasses, reading, bookNext month Boston’s Gay Men’s Book Club meets on Monday, October 29th in the Back Bay at Trident Bookseller’s & Cafe on Newbury Street. If you’re looking for something to read and interested in meeting gay men in a more social setting that doesn’t involve a gym, bar or an app this may be worth checking out.

This month the group is reading The Disintegrations by Alistair McCartney. The book was the winner of the Publishing Triangle’s 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ fiction and named one of the best works of fiction for 2017 by The Seattle Times and Entropy Magazine.  This enigmatic novel confronts both the impossibility of understanding death and the timeless longing for immortality.

Gay Men’s Book Club
Monday, October 29th at 7PM
At Trident Booksellers & Cafe

The Disintegrations can be purchased online at major resellers but you may also buy this from one of our wonderful independent bookstores. If you’re open to supporting local bookstores, try one of the links I’ve shared below, which takes you right to the book’s page so you can order it in just a couple of clicks!

Brookline Booksmith in Coolidge Corner
Harvard Bookstore in Harvard Square
Papercuts JP in Jamaica Plain
Porter Square Bookstore in Porter Square
Trident Bookseller’s & Cafe in Back Bay

Patrick Horrigan reads from his novel Pennsylvania Station

gay authors, gay literature, The History Project, gay boston

Later this month this month  The History Project will be hosting a reading of  Patrick Horrigan’s novel, Pennsylvania Station, that is free and open to the public but does require registering to ensure space will be available. You can reserve your space through Eventbrite.

Thursday, September 27th
Doors open at 6:00PM
Book reading begins at 6:30PM

Horrigan will also share how he weaves together the history of New York’s old Penn Station, the historic preservation movement, and the pre-Stonewall gay rights movement. Horrigan’s book is available for sale everywhere but help support Boston’s local and independent bookstores by placing an online order for his novel at these locations:

Brookline Booksmith 279 Harvard Street by Coolidge Corner
Harvard Bookstore  1256 Mass Ave in Harvard Square
Porter Square Bookstore 25 White Street in Porter Square
Trident Bookseller’s & Cafe 338 Newbury Street in Back Bay

Summer readin’

gay pulp  fictionPublished in 1970 I can only imagine this gay pulp fiction novel must’ve been a real page turner (I’m joking BTW).

Summer readin’

gay pulp fictionOMG, can you imagine reading this book while commuting on your way to work?

Summer readin’

gay pulp fictionPublished in 1970 this gay pulp fiction novel shows just how far we’ve come. Can you imagine any gay man introducing his husband to someone as his wife?

Book review: Less by Andrew Sean Greer

gay literature, book reviewIt is rare that I read a book that has won as many accolades as Less by Andrew Sean Greer. The national best seller went on to win the Pulitzer Prize and even though I was initially questioning what all the hype was about, once Arthur Less starts his travels, I couldn’t help but get swept up in this story about a little known novelist, trying to live off the acclaim he received from his first book and past relationship with a famous, aging poet.

When Less Andrew’s on again / off again lover (who is much younger than him) sends him an invitation to his wedding, it proves to be more than he can handle. That news, combined with the realization that he will turn 50 in a few months results in a comical midlife crisis. Less decides to decline the wedding invitation and embark on an around the world trip first to NYC then Europe before heading to Morocco, India and finally Japan before settling back home in San Francisco. I think of the trip as a funnier and more relatable, Eat, Pray Love (gay men of a certain age are really going to enjoy).

Less is about a struggling gay author who suffers a spectacular midlife crisis which Greer details beautifully in his book.

Andrew Sean Greer makes a handful of literary references in each chapter, most of which go over my head, but in spite of those references, I found myself either smiling or laughing as I turned the pages. The book is also full of really beautiful insights like this conversation Less has with a friend late one night in Morocco after he learns his friend is splitting with his partner of 20 years. His friend, Lewis, refuses to think of his 20 year relationship as anything but a success.

But you broke up with him. Something’s wrong. Something failed.
       No! No, Arthur, no, it’s the opposite! I’m saying it’s a success. Twenty years of joy and support and friendship, that’s a success. Twenty years of anything with another person is a success… 
     You can’t do this, Lewis. You’re Lewis and Clark. Lewis and fucking Clark. It’s my only hope out their that gay men can last.
     Oh Arthur. This is lasting. Twenty years is lasting! And this has nothing to do with you.

This book can be purchased online at major resellers but you may also buy this in person or online at local bookstores. If you’re open to supporting local bookstores try one of these links, which will take you right to the book so you can make a quick purchase online if that is your preference.

Brookline Booksmith 279 Harvard Street by Coolidge Corner
Harvard Bookstore  1256 Mass Ave in Harvard Square
Papercuts JP 5 Green Street, Jamaica Plain
Porter Square Bookstore 25 White Street in Porter Square
Trident Bookseller’s & Cafe 338 Newbury Street in Back Bay