Tag Archives: Boston

Boston’s first marijuana dispensary (finally) opens on Monday

Marijuana was made legal after the question was put to voters at the ballot box in 2016. Statewide 53.7% of the vote was in favor of legalization with 46.3% voting against “Question 4” as it came to be known. In the city of Boston even more of the electorate (67%) voted in favor of legalizing marijuana.

The current Mayor of Boston and Governor of Massachusetts did everything they could to slowdown and complicate the process for paving the way for businesses to open. However, on Monday, Boston will FINALLY have its first recreational marijuana shop.

Pure Oasis pot shop is located at 430 Blue Hill Avenue between Jones Hill and Eglston Square. Their daily hours of operation are between 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Pure Oasis happens to also be the first applicant under the economic empowerment equity programs created by the commissio, which gives priority to applicants from areas disenfranchised by the war on drugs.

You can read more about Boston’s first marijuana dispensary for recreational use, here.

Median Boston rental prices near MBTA subway stations

boston rent, renthop, rent hopRentHop has shared their annual Boston T Rent Map, which focuses on MBTA subway stations. They have created an interactive version of this map that lets you select individual T stops to show median rents for 1 bedrooms nearby.

Obviously, the downtown neighborhoods are most expensive with most stops in downtown featuring rents in the $3,000 range for a one-bedroom unit, but as you move out of the city center rents drop. Below are some examples noted for each line as uncovered by RentHop.

  • $1,247  btwn Aquarium ($3,397) and Maverick ($2,150) – Blue Line
  • $1,100  btwn Back Bay ($3,600) and Mass Ave ($2,500) – Orange Line
  • $900 btwn Broadway ($3,300) and Andrew ($2,400) – Orange Line
  • $649  btwn Kendall/MIT ($3,149) and Central ($2,500) – Red Line
  • $600  btwn Copley ($3,100) and Hynes ($2,500) – Green Line

Boston Public Library McKim building opened 125 years ago

BPLThe Boston Public Library (BPL) in Copley Square first opened its doors to the public on Sunday, February 3, 1895, and tomorrow marks the 125th anniversary of this iconic building’s opening. While this wasn’t the first home of the library, it is the only home anyone alive today would know.

The BPL is the 3rd largest public library in the United States behind only the U.S. Library of Congress and the New York City Public Library. However, it’s not the amazing amount of research nor its prized collections or priceless artwork  that make this such a beloved institution.

The BPL anchors the west side of Copley Square in the heart of Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. It is where many important cultural and sporting events take place; such as the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Since 1897, every April (on Patriot’s Day) tens of thousands of runners cross in front of the  Boston Library and every parade of note either lines up alongside or pass by these buildings.

BPL, Todd Van HoosearThe original building (a.k.a. The McKim building) and its gorgeous courtyard that was inspired by Rome’s Palazzo della Cancelleria are sanctuaries I go to often and places I show anyone who visits Boston. Bates Hall (shown below) on the second floor of the McKim Building features 50-foot-high barrel vault ceiling and is a must-see for any architecture enthusiasts. Travel + Leisure agrees with me too – check out their 2016 article about the BPL here.

BPL

UNIVERSALIMAGESGROUP/GETTY IMAGES

Next time you’re in the Back Bay, take a few minutes to pay the BPL a visit and appreciate this cultural gem.

Outdoor ice skating rinks in Boston

The winter is more fun if you take advantage of the colder weather to engage in seasonal activities like ice skating (it doesn’t matter if you’re crap at it). Channel your inner Adam Rippon and make plans to go out and have some fun.

Below are five ice skating rinks that you can enjoy as well as some suggestions on where you can go after to warm up. 

Frog Pond Skating Rink at the Boston Common
$6 Admission || $12 rental fee
Warm up after by ordering a Hot Toddy at Yvonne’s

The Rink at 401 Park in The Fenway 
$10 Admission || $6 rental fee
Warm up after at the bar at TimeOut Boston

Snowport Winter Village in Seaport
$5 Admission || $5 rental fee
Warm up after with a decadent hot chocolate at Flour

Community Ice Skating in Kendall Square
$5 Admission || $8 rental fee
Warm up after with a double espresso at barismo

DCR Kelly Outdoor Rink in JP
Free Admission || $3 rental fee
Warm up after with a decadent hot chocolate at JP Licks

No Pants Subway Ride Boston is this Sunday

No Pants Subway Ride Boston

Boston’s No Pants Subway Ride is this Sunday

Calling all exhibitionists and pranksters: Boston’s 14th annual No Pants Subway Ride (NPSR) is this Sunday, January 12th from 1-3PM.  Details for participating in the No Pants Subway Ride (and the fun no pants after party) are posted here.

Meet at 1 Pemberton Square (near Gov’t Center) by 1:00 PM. Look for someone with an umbrella (and possibly a cape) who will give you instructions on the specific route you’ll be asked to travel. NOTE: Show up fully clothed – you will be instructed (when / where to remove your pants once on the MBTA). After riding the MBTA a pants optional after party will be at McGreevy’s (911 Boylston Street, Boston). Watch this helpful video for more information and tips.

About the Boston NPSR:
Attendees will ride various T lines wearing all of their normal winter clothes with the minor exception of missing pants. Throughout the ride, participants are encouraged to act as if nothing is out of the ordinary. G-strings, jockstraps, etc… are not allowed – the idea is to be cheeky without showing your cheeks if you understand my meaning.

Massachusetts RMV recognizes “Gender X”

non binary gender option in MassachusettsMassachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles now provides drivers with a third gender option to choose from. The option, “X,” is available for people to select who don’t identify as male or female.

This past Tuesday, during Transgender Awareness Week, Massachusetts state registry of motor vehicles (RMV) started offering residents a non-binary gender designation option for their driver’s licenses and ID cards. This was done as part of a system upgrade at the RMV and makes Massachusetts one of approximately a dozen states in the United States to recognize a third, non binary gender.

Almost on cue Massachusetts GOP Chairman Jim Lyons called this insane and railed against the change. I can appreciate there are people who’s heads spin at the idea of non-binary, but I don’t understand the need to make sure their point of view supersedes others or how decisions like this by the State of Massachusetts impact Mr. Lyons and those who agree with him. It seems like the same failed logic that was applied to opposing same sex marriages.

Nothing Gold Can Stay

robert frost, poem, poetryIn what has become an unintentional tradition, each October I post this poem on my blog. It is one of my favorite poems and happens to be by the famous 20th century American poet, Robert Frost.

Nothing gold can stay was inspired by the fall foliage in New England and was written nearly 100 years ago, back in 1923.

Nature’s first green is gold
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.